The Great Salty Stay In; Social Isolation the Seabird Way.

Ways we can stay connected whilst land locked.

So we’ve waited a week for you all to be accustomed to staying in. But now it’s time to start The Great Salty Stay In. We will be sharing tea, films, ideas and so much more with you while we stay at home.  Don’t worry – we are not asking you to learn a new language or musical instrument and you can pick and choose which ones you want to join in with. We will be releasing details of them on the Seabirds Page so please make sure you like the page for notifications in addition to being a member of the Salty Seabird Group. But here is what you can expect;

  1. Salty Social – Every Friday we will have zoom tea and chats. You can do this in your swimming cossie, swim hat and googles – feel free to be in the bath if you want! We will set up a virtual swim bath on a Sunday evening too but am concerned this breaks Seabirds Rule #1 No washing. Look in the group for events and zoom details.
  2. Seabird Story Time – Started by Anne, every Saturday night at 6pm in the Salty Seabird group someone starts a story with the standard “Once Upon and Time”; then it is up to the rest of us to use our imagination to keep the story going. References to nudity, handstands and mythical sea creatures encouraged.
  3. Short Salty Films – make sure you like the Seabird Page as these will be posted there rather than in the group. 5 minute uplifting watches that we have collected over the years….. We started with Walter yesterday, go watch, you’ll love him.
  4. Seabird Swimming Lessons – again on the Page we will share some land based stretches and exercises you can do to start getting ready for a summer full of long lush swims. They will NOT feature Joe Wicks but have been recommended by resident Salty Swim Teacher Emma
  5. Do Good Deeds in Dark Times – a phrase coined by our Cath. We are looking at ways we can continue to support those most in need during lock down. We had started collecting for food banks but that is tricky now we are staying at home. But we have a plan – that will be revealed later in the week.
  6. Linked to the above we want to out the fun back into fundraising when all of this is over. Thank you to Judith’s suggestion that we have a mass swim, dress up and raise money for those that are on the front-line. Details will follow when lock down is lifted. I am sure the minute lock down is lifted you will all head for the sea anyway, but this will be a chance for us all to be back together and celebrate key workers.
  7. Pen a Poem, a Seabird sonnet if you will. We have been asked to contribute to ‘Beneath the Surface’. The idea is to create a collaborative poem highlighting wellbeing and the sea. Contributing to the poem basically involves authors writing a four line stanza/paragraph about how the sea affects their mental health and wellbeing. There are no rules as to how or what to write, though preferably the first and last lines should rhyme.
  8. Books, Books and more books. Blog to follow with my top 10 reads. Rowena has started a Book Club, the first meet up is virtual and the first book is included in my Top Ten.
  9. Seabirds Sea Shanty. To the tune of “Roll the Old Chariot” we’d like to compose a sea shanty to sing which we hope to perform when we are released, in a pub with some professional guidance. Fake tattoos (and real ones), thick knitted jumpers, pipes and beards encouraged.
  10. Staying Salty – share videos of what you are doing to replace your Seabird swims. There have been people in wheelie bins, (not sure I’d fit) , outdoor baths (lucky bastards) and paddling pools. We’ve got Lorraine’s muffs and Laura’s cold bath so far………. It would be amazing to see selfies of you with your seabird products that we can share too.

Whatever you chose to do, or not to do, stay salty and stay safe Seabirds

Just Breathe…………..

We take to the sea to breathe – so why can;t we do it when we swim?

This year, Seabirds have expanded their offerings to include talks, events and courses. For the last 4 weeks we have provided some salties with beginner or intermediate swim technique sessions at the idyllic and iconic Pells Pool. From Breaststroke to Breathing….

We’ve been swimming in the sea as a group for sometime now and many salty swimmers wanted to improve their front crawl technique. Cue the Pells Pool sessions. 4 weeks of 30 minutes sessions in the 50yd (46m) freshwater pool. It is unheated and spring fed keeping it at type of temperatures we are used too. And with no shelter we were still able to experience the elements with every swim. A satisfactory compromise!

The majority of swimmers hadn’t had a lesson since they were children, which for most was the 1970s or 1980s. So we went back to basics and really focused on their body position and breathing. The body position was a quick fix for most, nailed with a few push and glide exercises. As for the breathing……….it was everyone’s brick wall.

The thing about breathing is, you have to do it to stay alive and humans don’t like it when they cannot do it freely. But in order for you to get the correct body position to swim crawl efficiently your head had to be in the water which restricts your breathing. So here are our top tips for beginners breathing.

Warm Up – As with any type of exercise the warm up is really important. With swimming it’s a really good time to regulate your breathing. For me my most relaxed swims are after I have done another type of exercise. You can’t beat a seafront run and then a swim, but a brisk walk or cycle to the beach will do.  My heart and lungs have regulated to the rhythm of my exertion and and that flows into the water. If I haven’t done any exercise I do a good deal of head up breaststroke before I start. Again my breathing acclimatises along with the rest of my body and once it is back into a relaxed rhythm I start front crawl. So Top Tip #1 is warm up until your breathing is regular.

Stop explosive breathing – the old fashioned lessons have a lot to answer for, and old habits die hard! All of the swimmers were filling their lungs to capacity and fully emptying them them on every cycle. That’s about 3 litres of breath or 6 pints in old money. When would you normally breath like that? (keep your answers clean!) I can’t really think of any instance when I would need that much oxygen in my body and the results can be dizziness and lightheadedness – hardly conducive to being able to relax! Normal breathing – which is all you need to do for Seabird swimming  – uses only about 20% of your total lung capacity AND it’s called Tidal breathing! Top Tip #2 Tidal Breathing

Try Trickle Breathing – As well as filling up their lungs to maximum capacity our salty swimmers were also trying to breath out and in in the short amount of time that their heads were out of the water. Even if you are practising tidal breathing it is hard to breath in and out at the same time. The result removes your relaxed state and promptly returns you to explosive breathing. The reason kids are taught to blow bubbles is to encourage them to trickle breathe  – i.e. gradually breathing out while your head is underwater and only inhale when you turn your head to breathe. Again this is easier said than done when you have spent decades taking huge gulps of air but you can practice in the bath, or while walking, or anywhere really. I swim with my mouth open (for those that know me my mouth is always open) and sing or count as I exhale. Top Tip #3 Trickle Breathing

RELAX – don’t over think it, just relax. If you are struggling and getting frustrated then stop. Nothing should get in the way of you having a good swim. Revert to your head out breast stroke or flip onto your back to float and only return to front crawl when you are ready. Play around with your breathing. Do you prefer to breath bilaterally – on both sides in a regular pattern every 3, 5 or 7 strokes? Or unilaterally – ie one side only so every 2, 4 or 6 strokes. I don’t breathe for my first 8 strokes and then I breathe every 2, 3, 4 or 5 depending on the sea conditions and how hard I am having to swim against the current. Because I am relaxed I am able to change it around and even if I take in a mouthful of water I can maintain my stroke and just breathe at the next opportunity. However, if hair gets in my face it is a very different story – all relaxed breathing goes out of the window – which is why I always wear a swim cap! And if you make me swim in a pool, even Pells I am explosive breathing with the best of them. Top Tip #4 Relax.

We’ve loved doing the Swim Technique sessions and we have loved being at Pells Pool. We are always looking at ways to introduce more people, regardless of age, ability or gender to enjoy outdoor swimming. AND, we are always looking or ways to raise funds to provide opportunities for people less fortunate than ourselves to swim themselves happy. So, if you are local to Sussex, please join us at Pells Pool on July 12th for our Summer Take Over. All profits will go towards future FREE sea swimming confidence for people struggling with their wellbeing – THANK YOU

Author: Seabird Kath

NB – We are looking at running more technique sessions in the future so it would be really good to know what people would like to gain from sessions in the sea or pool. Please leave your thoughts in the comments section. THANK YOU