Birds get Big Lottery Grant

This week at Seabirds HQ we have received the wonderful news that we will receive a lottery grant. The grant will fund a 6 week course focusing on women’s confidence in the water. It is aimed at women who wish to improve their physical, emotional and mental well being.  There are lots of courses locally run to help people transition from the pool to the sea but many people are intimidated by these courses, and imagine the participants to be all fit die-hard triathletes. Whether this be true or not, there is definitely a demand for a female-centric course. Many women struggle to get into a swim suit, let alone a pool or the wide open sea. Yet it is exactly these women that would benefit so much from introducing open water swimming into their lives.

The course will run in June 2019 but we will be testing out the course content on some ‘willing’ volunteers in September 2018. Our working title is Women, Well being and Water. We will be working with other agencies, charities and local community groups to create a course framework that can easily be used by other groups and clubs.

There are points in people’s lives where they need support to build resilience and to make improvements to their wellbeing. We believe that outdoor swimming can improve outcomes for women experiencing mental health challenges from first-hand experience. Having an understanding of the benefits of getting in the sea all year round, the Seabirds want to help make sure more people have the opportunity. Their courses aim to reduce obstacles to sea swimming, empower more women to get in the sea and use this fabulous, free, local resource in a safe and confident way.

Many women that would benefit most from sport and physical activity are the very women who are least likely to participate for cultural, personal, practical, and economic reasons. Helping women to overcome these barriers and supporting them to engage in activity will provide them with many positive outcomes and ensure that access to sport and physical activity is equal for all.

Open water swimming benefits have been researched and written about a great deal over the last few years and is often referred to as Blue Science. In 2009, Prof Michael Depledge and Dr William Bird, from the European Centre for Environment and Health, based out of the University of Exeter Medical School, proposed a notion called the “Blue Gym” – the idea being that the sea can be used as motivation to exercise outdoors to influence health and wellbeing.

Various social factors put women at greater risk of poor mental health than men. However, women’s readiness to talk about their feelings and their strong social networks can help protect their mental health. Seabirds already have an established network of sea swimmers that gain confidence and happiness from being part of a community group. The course would act as a foundation for women to join the already established swimming community group providing them with respite from daily worries, a support network and a regular activity and meet up.

We literally cannot wait to get more women in the sea!

Come Swim with us……….

Seabirds are a group of swimmers that swim in the sea on Brighton and Hove’s beaches all year round.

We are not an official club but rather a community of like-minded swimmers. We post in our Facebook Group where and when we are swimming for others to join. There are early morning, daytime and evening swims. The locations change as do the fluid times but are normally to the west of the West Pier. We even do day trips sometimes!

Some of us skin swim all year round and are great believers in cold water therapy. Others wear wet-suits. As the seasons change so does our attire and we can often be found cooing over a seabird latest swim paraphernalia buy. We don’t really care what you wear as long as you get in the sea!

We aren’t concerned with times or distances. Depending on who joins us on the day will dictate whether it’s a disciplined swim around the buoys or a leisurely social swim, parallel to the pebbles, counting the concrete groynes.

You can chose your stroke. Some do front crawl, others breaststroke and a few back stroke. We are yet to spot a butterflying seabird.

We understand that there are points in people’s lives where they need support; to build resilience and make improvements to their well being. The sea dipping and swimming seabird community provides company and respite from day to day challenges and worries. In the sea noone cares if you cry – (unless you are wearing goggles as it’s kinda counter productive.) It’s all salt water after all. Seabirds swim as a flock for a reason.

Even on days when it is too rough to go in we will meet and paddle, pilchard (lie in the shore dump) or walk. And there is always tea and sometimes even cake. We have no clubhouse so you need to be prepared to change on the beach!

Our swim spots are named and are  based on the Lifeguard Post they are situated within. Last year the crafty Seafront Office changed the names of them so they went in numerical order east to west. So we now have various names from D5 (Old name – short for Dolphin 5 in front of Hove Lawns Cafe) to Romeo 8 (New name in front of the bandstand).

As an ‘unofficial’ club we have no rules……but we also have no Public Liability Insurance and participants swim at their own risk. We stick to lifeguarded beaches in the summer months and make safe choices in the colder rougher winter ones.

So what’s stopping you? Come and swim with us!

Seabird’s Book Club – July Book

So I finished the Salt Path. It was a wonderful read. I know many of the places referred to on the SW Coastal Path so it was very familiar to me. The situation the main characters found themselves in, is not. It left me heart broken at times, especially knowing that this was NOT a work of fiction! A read for the bedroom or the sofa rather than a public beach unless you are wearing a huge pair of Jackie ‘O’ glasses to hide the tears. I really warmed to Raynor – a survivor in the truest sense. If you haven’t read it yet – DO!

This month’s book is The Last Wave by Gillian Best. Her debut novel. I am already nearly finished and is an easy read. The story is told by the main characters – each with their own perspective on events that happen throughout their lives. Always in the background is one woman’s love of sea swimming and the escape from day to day drudge, responsibilities and worries it provides. The main character, Martha, is clearly a Seabird. I hope you enjoy the July read.

Here’s the blurb: A beautifully rendered family drama set in England between the 1940s and the present, following the life of Martha, a woman who has swum the English Channel ten times, and the complex relationships she has with her husband, her children and her close friends.

The one constant in Martha’s life is the sea, which offers an escape from her responsibilities as a wife and a mother, consolation when she becomes ill and comfort when her husband succumbs to dementia.

The Last Wave is a wholly authentic, tragicomic portrait of family life as it is buffeted by sickness, intolerance, anger, failure and regret. This mature and compelling new voice offers a novel soaked in empathy and salt water.

Here’s how the seabirds virtual Book Club works;

  • Once a Month a new book is chosen for the Seabird virtual Book Blub members to read.
  • It will be announced on Social Media.
  • Ideally the book chosen should be water, sea, swimming, well being related.
  • Anyone can chose a book or write a review – just comment away on social media or here.

 

 

The Fish that remembered how to swim…the sequel

Solo swim around the buoys. Feeling very proud of myself as I am not a solo swimmer. The other seabirds opted for a parallel groyne run but I was desperate for a long 'proper' swim. After a quick moon dip on Tuesday night and  sharing the water with 30 kids yesterday and wednesday I actually welcomed the solitude and only got spooked once  by a fish.  As is usual I obviously chose the wrong direction to swim. Really hard leg home against a current pushing me out and west when I wanted to swim in and east. Took what felt like forever. Sandy bottom view was beginning to get monotonous.  Lovely welcome home crowd. Lots of teeny tiny jellyfish attracted to the movement of my hands. Took a while to see them as so translucent and super speedy. Think they may have been stinging me which felt like tickles. (Swim robe available @seabirds_ltd)  #justkeepswimming #soloswim #swimbuoys #swimbetweentheflags #swimsafe #jellyfish #swimrobe @booicorestore #skinswim #outdoorswim #iloveorange #swimyourselfhappy #getinthesea #saltedwellbeing #stillsmiling
There has been progress since the Fish that forgot how to swim.
Today I did a solo swim around the buoys.  I am feeling very proud of myself as I am not a solo swimmer. Seabirds swim in flocks. The other seabirds opted for a parallel groyne run but I was desperate for a long ‘proper’ swim. I was going against the formation.
I was provided with lots of Seabird support and encouragement to give it a go. The Sea Front Office boat was patrolling with a crew and helm that I knew. In reality it’s no different to swimming with others. You can’t chat when you have less than a second to take a breath. But something about knowing there is a Seabird nearby gives you confidence to venture further away from the shore.
So after a quick cheerio, I set off! After a short moon dip on Tuesday night and sharing the water with 30 kids yesterday and Wednesday I actually welcomed the solitude and only got spooked once by a fish. I was quickly in a one, two, three, breathe hypnotic peaceful rhythm.

As is usual, I chose the wrong direction to swim. Even after my Tidal Walk lesson. In my defence, the Lifeguard on post went for a swim during her break and swan the same way….so I just assumed she had opted for hard start and easy finish.  Obviously not. It was a really hard leg home against a current pushing me out and west when I wanted to swim in and east. Took what felt like forever. Sandy bottom view was beginning to get monotonous.

There was a lovely welcome home crowd. A couple of Seabirds frolicking in the shallows but also lots of teeny tiny jellyfish attracted to the movement of my hands. Took a while to see them as so translucent and super speedy. Think they may have been stinging me which felt like tickles. Wikipedia tells me they are baby moon jellyfish. I was transfixed for ages watching them.

So 4 hours later and I am still smiling. Smiling because it was a lovely swim in crystal clear turquoise warm water. Smiling because the jellyfish were so cool and I felt like I was in an episode of Blue Planet. #doitfordavid. But most of all smiling because this seabird swan solo. She broke the flock formation, came back and it reformed on the beach post swim with a cup of tea and a picnic. I can do it!

The fish that forgot how to swim – how this seabird forgot to practice what she preaches

It’s been days since I have been in the sea. Even for a paddle. My cossie lies unused in a heap on my bedroom floor. My googles are stiff and brittle from under use. I look longingly at the Seabird’s Facebook posts and Instagram feed of wonderful sunny dips in crystal clear summer seas. But I am missing.

I have long talked about the benefits of skin swimming all year round and will bore anyone who is willing to listen about how it has helped me personally. Please Note; I will also bore those that aren’t willing to listen. But I have stopped going in. Hardly an endorsement of my passionate belief that salt water and the Seabird flock can cure pretty much anything.

I haven’t stopped because I am scared. I haven’t stopped because it doesn’t work. I have stopped because I am busy. There I said it. I’m one of ‘those‘ people who wear BUSY as a badge of honour. You know the ones that tell you they work 16 hour days, 7 days a week. The ones that when you ask them how they are instead of replying ‘fine’ they give you their to do list or a break down of their social calendar. The ones that can’t take the two seconds required to reply ‘OK’ to your text yet their Social Media activity is ever present. You know the ones!

To be fair the busy I have been is all good busy. The eldest has navigated her way through GCSEs and Prom which I wanted to be very present for. The youngest has started heading for the hills after school on his mountain bike and playing cricket so lots of random last minute dinner time and menu changes. We are in the start up phase of Seabirds Ltd which has included the webshop launch and pop ups. A big learning curve plus a lot of marketing including writing blogs! Usual summer socials like Festivals, Fairs and BBQs. And I am free-lancing as a Surf Life Saving Instructor teaching 30+ local school kids a day some fundamental first aid and life saving skills before they break up for the summer holidays. So I am getting in the sea, but sharing it with 30+ kids isn’t exactly the salted well-being I need. Think less serene and more screams!

But it is exactly now, when busy becomes overwhelming, and the brain has too many tabs open that rest and respite is needed. For me this takes the form of  a sea swim. 10 minutes. 30 minutes. Dare I say it, an hour of sea swimming self care is long overdue.

TIME FOR AN INTERVENTION! (Of the swimming kind)

So today I have packed my swim bag! I have a ton of paperwork to catch up on today and then a Social Enterprise Start Up workshop to attend 5-8pm. (See there I go again telling anyone who will listen how busy I am!) But after that I am heading for the big blue. I have also figured out with a bit of organisation I can get in in the mornings before a load of excited school kids arrive and teaching begins.  I just need to be organised and creative with the times that I swim.  So I will be keeping a small packed swim bag with me on my travels all week and taking advantage whenever I can. There’s normally a seabird available somewhere for company but if not I am going to have to brave a solo swim. Not done one of the those before. Done skin swimming all year round. TICK. Done round the swim area buoys. TICK.  But never swum alone. I think it is time to give that one a TICK.

As Dory would say…………just keep swimming……………..

 

 

 

 

 

 

From wet behind the ears to wet behind the ears!

The Seabird’s natural habitat is the sea in Brighton and Hove. Not behind a desk struggling with software, Social Media and suppliers. As the weather (and sea) have warmed up this is where we have found ourselves more and more. Why? Because after many conversations over post swim cuppas and cake, three of our flock decided to set up a Social Enterprise.

The company name Seabirds was chosen as it reflects the three Company Directors and how the business was conceptualised. Seabirds are a group of women that skin swim in the sea all year round on Brighton beach. Seabirds was born of the sea (and in the sea, literally).

Over the last 6 months we have registered Seabirds Brighton as a Community Interest Company with two aims:

  1. To run a successful trading arm that generates an unrestricted and alternative funding stream for local community groups and small charities. Our beneficiaries must meet our objectives and funding priorities of i) local/community based, ii) sea/beach centred iii) aims to improve well-being and the environment.
  2. Deliver regular women’s water confidence programmes in the local community

All of this sounds great doesn’t it? Being you own boss. Working around family life and other work commitments. And it is, but who knew we were so green.

When setting up the business we thought that the experience from our previous lives, that we bought to the table, ticked all the boxes. Backgrounds in Project Management, Design and Retail. Even so the learning curve has been a very sharp arc. Sometimes a vertical climb.

We navigated our way through understanding which legal structure was right for us. Wrote a Business Plan. Applied for a bank account. Bought domain names. Launched a crowdfunder. Attended webinars and workshops on Marketing and Finance. Lot of lovely friends have helped us every step of the way, providing guidance and expertise.

Today we launched our website and online retail business. This is where the learning became steep. Every supplier we deal with wants our in-house designs in a different format from .ai to .png. Their lead times vary from 2 days to 2 months. We are still waiting for some stock to arrive. Our website host Customer Service team are super friendly and helpful but many of the things we want it to do, it just doesn’t do, or we can’t get it to do. Then we decided to launch the webshop at the same time as GDPR was being rolled out. All the while we are trying to understand twitter.

But we’ve done it! It’s Live. It’s launched. And we’ve had some sales. And we couldn’t have done it without each other. For every wobble there was a cuddle. For every frustration there was a voice of reason. For every ‘I’m going to throw my laptop out of the window’ moment there was company and cup of tea. We doff our caps to every sole trader and entrepreneur that has gone before us. The utmost admiration for people that do this alone without a supportive network of seabirds.

The next few weeks will be spent analysing google analytics and researching meta tags. Not standard language for a seabird. Nothing comes without a hashtag. Everything is a marketing opportunity. All of  it is outside of our comfort zone. But it will also include a return to our habitat. Time to take our own advice and Get In The Sea!

Blue Sea Thinking

Using Skin Swimming to beat the dark clouds of depression

Blue Sky Sea Thinking

I have had depression and anxiety for as long as I can remember.
I have also loved being in, on or around the sea for as long as I can remember. It’s only been over the last few years that I have used the big blue as a therapy for my dark days.
Last year, when life threw me a gut punching curve ball, I recognised the familiar dark clouds forming on the horizon and took to the sea with what would become the Seabirds.
Two friends who had also been bashed around by life came with me. We bobbed, we splashed, we squealed, we cried, we laughed, we drank buckets full of tea and the clouds stayed on the horizon.

We formed a plan to skin swim all year round, build a community of like-minded seabirds, which we did, and the clouds stayed on the horizon.

As the temperature dropped our support and encouragement for each other did not. The sea didn’t disappoint, the endorphins flowed, the self-doubt retreated, the mental monkeys were silenced and the clouds stayed on the horizon.

I know the clouds are on the horizon. But as long as my frazzled brain gets some respite from my constant internal conversation from bobbing, surfing, swimming, paddling in the sea, they stay there as part of the view. Part of my world, but not the centre of it, as it has been at times.

There is lots of science about how and why salt water wellbeing works. In 2009, Prof Michael Depledge and Dr William Bird, from the European Centre for Environment and Health, based out of the University of Exeter Medical School, proposed a notion called the “Blue Gym” – the idea being that the sea can be used as motivation to exercise outdoors to influence health and wellbeing.

They found that regular contact with natural environments provided three major health benefits: reduced stress, increased physical activity and created stronger communities. They also found that people who lived 1km from the coast had much better self-reported health than those who lived inland.

Over the years, I have tried a more main stream approach to managing my mental health. I have tried various prescription drugs, had counselling, attended CBT courses, stop taking hormone contraceptives and the like. All of them have had an impact, to varying degrees and I am certainly not saying anyone taking prescription medication or therapy should stop. I am a seabird, not a doctor. But I would recommend Vitamin Sea as a complimentary approach.

Taking time to be in the salt water does work. The constant horizon is respite from screen scrolling. The sound of shingle moving under the waves is a welcome relief to traffic noises. The cold water gets your heart pumping and your endorphins flowing making you happy to be alive. It is a free and safe way to manage your clouds.

So what’s stopping you? Get in the sea!

………….The next Seabird challenge is a Mile in the Morning. It is exactly what is says. Now we have mastered the art of getting in all year round it’s time to swim further and for longer. Keep checking back to see how we are getting on!