August Book Club Read

A Boy in the Water by Tom Gregory

This months book is a book I was bought for my birthday by my mum. It was on my list of books to read so it was perfect timing when it arrived in the post. I haven’t actually read it yet – I am saving it for my summer holiday in France next week.

But look at it, just look at it. A 1980’s nostalgic snap on the front cover and the familiar penguin publishing orange is just inviting you in!

As my eldest child is preparing to leave home next year and we have lots of ‘last’ holidays this type of book could tip me over the edge. I have spent this summer wistfully looking back over old photos of both my children and photos of me as a child – an emotional trip back in time.  All of our happy times are by the sea. We’re just back from a very quick trip to the Isle of Wight which still has early closing. Physically transporting me back in time. So I think it will be tissues at the ready when I read this book.

The author, Tom is the the youngest person to have ever swum the channel. It is a memoir that spans 4 years with a back drop of 80s music on mix tapes. Reading the reviews even made my eyes begin to sting. It is a book that captures the innocence of childhood, the determination of a man in the making and the relationship between swimmer and coach. I cannot wait to dive in!

 

July Book Club Read

July’s Seabird Book Club Read. Floating

It’s been less that a month since we re-launched the Seabirds Virtual Book Club but it is already time for July’s book.

This month we move away from the science of Tristan Gooley to the memoir by Joe Minihane. “Floating: A Life Regained” sees the author follow in the footsteps of Roger Deakin and swims in the locations described in Waterlog. As a Seabird my favourite type of swimming is floating so the title immediately appealed. Joe is also based in Brighton so there was another tenuous link. He probably won’t remember, but I met him swimming in the sea once in front of the bandstand with his friend Seabird Laura. I went all a bit star struck and he just smiled.

As for the book – I know it will appeal to the seabird flock. It’s acutely honest and touches upon topics we regularly consider when swimming in the sea. Our joyful love of being outside and experiencing nature first hand. The warmth of the friendship we have found within our flock. A story of acceptance of his anxiety and how to live with it is also a common theme in our clan.

He writes; “In swimming I found the only thing that truly broke me out of my anxious cycle for longer than a few moments…I swam to fix myself.”

It’s on my list to read again, and again, and again. Joe is a Seabird. Enjoy Salties

xx

 

Seabird Summer Reads

With summer on the horizon. or at least the hope of summer, it’s time to get out a pile of books to read!

With summer holidays on the horizon and the wild swim group continuing to grow it feels like the right time to re-launch the Seabirds Book Club

The next best thing to being in the sea is getting lost in a good book. During our sea swims we often find ourselves talking about the last book we read or which book is next on our list.

Here’s how the seabirds virtual Book Club works;

  • Once a Month a new book is chosen for the Seabird virtual Book Club members to read.
  • It will be announced on Social Media.
  • Ideally the book chosen should be water, sea, swimming, well being related.
  • Anyone can chose a book or write a review – just comment away on social media or here.

This month’s book is ‘How to Read Water: Clues & Patterns from Puddles to the Sea’ by Tristan Gooley. It teaches you how to read the sea and forecast the weather from the waves. It also includes how to read the water associated with ponds and rivers as well as interpreting the colour of the water and understand wave patterns as they break on the beach.

There are lots of references to wild swimming in Sussex so it should prove to be a Seabird’s favourite. It also builds on some of the sea behaviours we touched upon in the Safe Swim Q & A series at Sea Lanes. But our best tenuous link is that the author attended Sandhurst Royal Military Academy with Salty Seabird Jo – apparently he was asked to leave after turning up naked to parade! For that reason alone it must be worth a read.

Here are the links to previous reads;

June 2018 read – The Salt Path , Raynor Winn

July 2018 read – The Last Wave,  Gillian Best

August 2018 read – The Whitstable High Tide Swimming Club by Katie May

September 2018 read – Wild Woman Swimming, Lynne Roper

October 2018 read – I found my Tribe, Ruth Fitzmaurice

November 2018 read -Swell A Waterbiography by Jenny Landreth

 

 

 

I Found My Tribe – Seabirds October Book Club Read

I don’t believe we are just numbing ourselves in this sea. I look at my friends coping and surviving. Like the rolling of waves, the thrill of the dive, the rush of the cold, they choose to stay unchained. This is as free as we can possibly be

So this months book review has been written in one of Brighton’s Cafes when I was able to prise my hands away from a hot steaming mug.  I have just been for a sea swim and now it is October there is definitely a drop in the air temperature requiring a thaw out afterwards. What better way to do it on International Coffee Day, in a Cafe, writing about a book that resonated with me so strongly. This month’s book is ‘I Found My Tribe’ by Ruth Fitzmaurice.

I have very little in common with the author but so much in common with her. It is a collection of memories of her life, with her membership in the Tragic Wives’ Swimming Club as a back drop. It documents her thoughts, fears, experiences and swims from the point when her husband is diagnosed with MND to a full moon swim on their wedding anniversary. The chapters are all short and sweet with the most wonderful titles, such as ‘Waves (And Cheese Puffs)’

The things I do not have in common with the author are numerous. She has 5 kids none of whom are in double digits and I have 2 teenagers but we are both mums. Her husband has Motor Neurone Disease and can only communicate with his eyes. Mine is fighting fit but we both struggle to always see eye to eye with our spouses. She lives in rural Ireland and I live in urban Brighton but we both love swimming in the sea and use it as a coping strategy to deal with everyday life. She swims with the Tragic Wives’ Club and I swim with the Salty Seabirds.

I genuinely do not know how she has managed to fit in a swim with 5 children and a husband who needs round the clock care. She is really quite remarkable, hugely resilient and a great role model for modern day mothers. But the best bit about the book is you can easily pick it up and put it down. It is a perfect read for the train or bus as they are all short sweet chapters that can be read independently of each other. Or for those of us that start to get sleepy when we read before bed. Or for readers that just want to grab a read with a sandwich at lunchtime. Just remember your tissues!

Along with Lynne Roper who penned last month’s book Wild Woman Swimming, I was inspired by Ruth to organise a Harvest Moon swim for the Seabirds last week. Ruth’s moon swim is the conclusion to her book and it was something I was very keen to try. It was wonderful watching my tribe appear across the shingle and make their way to the waters edge to swim under a simply stunning full moon. At that moment I knew I had found my tribe.

Hope you all enjoy the book – as ever please do let us know!