The Ultimate Beach Gear Checklist

Get ready for the beach with a guest blog from https://www.thebooicorestore.com/

booicore

When our friends over at Seabirds asked us to write a guest blog post for their site, we were thrilled. Their business ethos is very similar to ours, and we love the fact that the three founding members enjoy being outside and doing something playful (i.e. sea swimming) as we love being outside too. In fact, our business (booicore) was formed because we are outdoor enthusiasts who had struggled for years with getting changed outdoors.

Not only do we share a love of the beach with Seabirds, but we also love nothing more than grabbing our kids and heading off to the coast. There are some essential items we need to take with us, though, to make sure we make the most of the day.

Water Bottle (but not a plastic one!)

We do get hot summer days, even in the UK, and so making sure that everyone stays refreshed and hydrated is really important – as you don’t want anyone to get sunstroke. A good idea is to take reusable water bottles, that you can refill, rather than plastic ones. After all, we love the beach, so we want to make sure we look after it – right?

 

Camping Stove and Mugs

When we go to the beach, we go for the day – which means we are often there as night starts to fall too. Having a camping stove and mugs with us means we can soon whip up a hot chocolate and some sausages for tea.

Beach Tent

If you have doggies, this will come in really useful to give them some respite from the heat, but it also comes in useful for humans too! Helps you to get out of the midday sun and offers some protection if the wind gets too much. Just have a practice putting it away a few times before you take it to the beach for the first time!

 

Wet Suit

If you are going to be in and out of the water all day, you need to protect your skin (and keeping warm) with a well-fitting wet suit. A wetsuit is designed to use your body heat to warm you up by trapping the water between your skin and the fabric. If your wetsuit is too loose, then the seawater will just flush through leaving you cold and shaky.

 

Outdoor Changing Robe

Even on the hottest days in the UK, it can still get a little chilly on the beach and so one of our booicore towelling robes is essential to warm you up and dry you off afterwards. They are simply the best thing to take with you, whatever activity you are doing – and are great as an extra layer when night falls as well.

 

We hope this has given you some ideas as to what to take with you next time you hit the beach. We hope you have a great summer – and happy swimming!

Just Breathe…………..

We take to the sea to breathe – so why can;t we do it when we swim?

This year, Seabirds have expanded their offerings to include talks, events and courses. For the last 4 weeks we have provided some salties with beginner or intermediate swim technique sessions at the idyllic and iconic Pells Pool. From Breaststroke to Breathing….

We’ve been swimming in the sea as a group for sometime now and many salty swimmers wanted to improve their front crawl technique. Cue the Pells Pool sessions. 4 weeks of 30 minutes sessions in the 50yd (46m) freshwater pool. It is unheated and spring fed keeping it at type of temperatures we are used too. And with no shelter we were still able to experience the elements with every swim. A satisfactory compromise!

The majority of swimmers hadn’t had a lesson since they were children, which for most was the 1970s or 1980s. So we went back to basics and really focused on their body position and breathing. The body position was a quick fix for most, nailed with a few push and glide exercises. As for the breathing……….it was everyone’s brick wall.

The thing about breathing is, you have to do it to stay alive and humans don’t like it when they cannot do it freely. But in order for you to get the correct body position to swim crawl efficiently your head had to be in the water which restricts your breathing. So here are our top tips for beginners breathing.

Warm Up – As with any type of exercise the warm up is really important. With swimming it’s a really good time to regulate your breathing. For me my most relaxed swims are after I have done another type of exercise. You can’t beat a seafront run and then a swim, but a brisk walk or cycle to the beach will do.  My heart and lungs have regulated to the rhythm of my exertion and and that flows into the water. If I haven’t done any exercise I do a good deal of head up breaststroke before I start. Again my breathing acclimatises along with the rest of my body and once it is back into a relaxed rhythm I start front crawl. So Top Tip #1 is warm up until your breathing is regular.

Stop explosive breathing – the old fashioned lessons have a lot to answer for, and old habits die hard! All of the swimmers were filling their lungs to capacity and fully emptying them them on every cycle. That’s about 3 litres of breath or 6 pints in old money. When would you normally breath like that? (keep your answers clean!) I can’t really think of any instance when I would need that much oxygen in my body and the results can be dizziness and lightheadedness – hardly conducive to being able to relax! Normal breathing – which is all you need to do for Seabird swimming  – uses only about 20% of your total lung capacity AND it’s called Tidal breathing! Top Tip #2 Tidal Breathing

Try Trickle Breathing – As well as filling up their lungs to maximum capacity our salty swimmers were also trying to breath out and in in the short amount of time that their heads were out of the water. Even if you are practising tidal breathing it is hard to breath in and out at the same time. The result removes your relaxed state and promptly returns you to explosive breathing. The reason kids are taught to blow bubbles is to encourage them to trickle breathe  – i.e. gradually breathing out while your head is underwater and only inhale when you turn your head to breathe. Again this is easier said than done when you have spent decades taking huge gulps of air but you can practice in the bath, or while walking, or anywhere really. I swim with my mouth open (for those that know me my mouth is always open) and sing or count as I exhale. Top Tip #3 Trickle Breathing

RELAX – don’t over think it, just relax. If you are struggling and getting frustrated then stop. Nothing should get in the way of you having a good swim. Revert to your head out breast stroke or flip onto your back to float and only return to front crawl when you are ready. Play around with your breathing. Do you prefer to breath bilaterally – on both sides in a regular pattern every 3, 5 or 7 strokes? Or unilaterally – ie one side only so every 2, 4 or 6 strokes. I don’t breathe for my first 8 strokes and then I breathe every 2, 3, 4 or 5 depending on the sea conditions and how hard I am having to swim against the current. Because I am relaxed I am able to change it around and even if I take in a mouthful of water I can maintain my stroke and just breathe at the next opportunity. However, if hair gets in my face it is a very different story – all relaxed breathing goes out of the window – which is why I always wear a swim cap! And if you make me swim in a pool, even Pells I am explosive breathing with the best of them. Top Tip #4 Relax.

We’ve loved doing the Swim Technique sessions and we have loved being at Pells Pool. We are always looking at ways to introduce more people, regardless of age, ability or gender to enjoy outdoor swimming. AND, we are always looking or ways to raise funds to provide opportunities for people less fortunate than ourselves to swim themselves happy. So, if you are local to Sussex, please join us at Pells Pool on July 12th for our Summer Take Over. All profits will go towards future FREE sea swimming confidence for people struggling with their wellbeing – THANK YOU

Author: Seabird Kath

NB – We are looking at running more technique sessions in the future so it would be really good to know what people would like to gain from sessions in the sea or pool. Please leave your thoughts in the comments section. THANK YOU

 

 

Seabird Summer Reads

With summer on the horizon. or at least the hope of summer, it’s time to get out a pile of books to read!

With summer holidays on the horizon and the wild swim group continuing to grow it feels like the right time to re-launch the Seabirds Book Club

The next best thing to being in the sea is getting lost in a good book. During our sea swims we often find ourselves talking about the last book we read or which book is next on our list.

Here’s how the seabirds virtual Book Club works;

  • Once a Month a new book is chosen for the Seabird virtual Book Club members to read.
  • It will be announced on Social Media.
  • Ideally the book chosen should be water, sea, swimming, well being related.
  • Anyone can chose a book or write a review – just comment away on social media or here.

This month’s book is ‘How to Read Water: Clues & Patterns from Puddles to the Sea’ by Tristan Gooley. It teaches you how to read the sea and forecast the weather from the waves. It also includes how to read the water associated with ponds and rivers as well as interpreting the colour of the water and understand wave patterns as they break on the beach.

There are lots of references to wild swimming in Sussex so it should prove to be a Seabird’s favourite. It also builds on some of the sea behaviours we touched upon in the Safe Swim Q & A series at Sea Lanes. But our best tenuous link is that the author attended Sandhurst Royal Military Academy with Salty Seabird Jo – apparently he was asked to leave after turning up naked to parade! For that reason alone it must be worth a read.

Here are the links to previous reads;

June 2018 read – The Salt Path , Raynor Winn

July 2018 read – The Last Wave,  Gillian Best

August 2018 read – The Whitstable High Tide Swimming Club by Katie May

September 2018 read – Wild Woman Swimming, Lynne Roper

October 2018 read – I found my Tribe, Ruth Fitzmaurice

November 2018 read -Swell A Waterbiography by Jenny Landreth

 

 

 

A Seabird trying to be greener…..

On the day of the latest global school climate strike what can we do to try to be greener……..

The recent UK Government ban on plastic earbuds and straws is welcome, but it is nowhere near enough.

While I know personal changes are not enough without systemic changes I am trying to reduce my own impact so that at least I am less part of the problem and working towards a solution. The Sea Squids are quite rightly putting on the pressure, inspired and informed by their participation in the Climate Strike.

Here are 4 changes I have made (and most importantly managed to sustain!) to help reduce my own plastic footprint:

  1. Refill – if you only refill your laundry liquid and softener think how many plastic bottles you will save each year! Brighton has the fabulous WASTENOT in the open market off London Road and Harriets of Hove for those further West. (disclosure: We have extra love for WasteNot cos they stock our beautiful stainless steel pints)
  2. Donate empty food containers (big enough for storing a takeaway – like ice-cream and large yoghurt ones, those that have come into your life when you know they shouldn’t …).  Bring them to the Jollof Cafe on a Tuesday. They need them and can share them with another great community group MEP who also need them to avoid food waste. While you are there, stay for a tasty vegan lunch! (donations for the mutual aid foodbank also very welcome).
  3. Be prepared – don’t get caught short without a sustainable alternative to plastic bagssingle use coffee cups and water bottles etc in your bag. All available from us at Seabirds where your purchase will directly support our work to improve mental and environmental wellbeing. This takes a bit of forward thinking and I still kick myself when I forget but I am getting there…bag by the door helps…
  4. Glitter! For those of us who have found that surprisingly, glitter enters their life when you live in Brighton and with Pride, March of the Mermaids and festival season approaching: biodegradable glitters that are plant-based, planet friendly and packaged sustainably! Spotted on Plastic Free Brighton

We welcome your suggestions and shout outs for local plastic reduction tips/groups/shops below

Author: Seabird Cath

Cold Water Swimming Hack!

How to beat the after-drop after cold water swimming

Discovered a few weeks ago whilst river swimming….

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I took an isothermal bottle  full of boiling water, my daughter’s mini hot-water-bottle and two core-warmers; one cotton for next to the skin and an ultra-warm one. Once out of the water and dressed (and while my fingers still worked) I filled the hot-water-bottle with the boiling water and popped the hot water bottle into my “roo pouch” of haramakis! Together with my robe, I built up a nice, warm core, which radiated heat.  Adding tea and amazing marmalade cakes, made for a delightfully happy, post-swim seabird! Been doing it ever since to beat the after-drop

cold water hack

 

Author: Seabird Catherine

Do Good Deeds in Dark Times

Doing good makes you feel good! How the Seabirds built doing good into their business

The Seabirds became a flotilla as our moral compass points the same way so swimming with each other in the same direction was easy. When we decided to start a business together our decision to be a social enterprise wasn’t even discussed. It was assumed. Registering as Community Interest Company was as fundamentally a part of our company set up as registering with Companies House and signing our Articles of Association. Ultimately we are a business and we need to make money to thrive. But with the money we make we reinvest in our business and donate to causes that share our aims of improving wellbeing and the environment. So why do we do this?

The News is full of unhappy headlines. The impact of austerity on the most vulnerable in society. Leaving Europe with ‘No Deal’. Climate Change and the plight of the Polar Bear. Global Civil War and unrest adding to the Refugee Crisis. I could go on but you get the picture.

I don’t read or watch the News. I bury my head firmly in the sand. It’s a form of Self Care. If I let myself dwell on the day’s news I become overwhelmed at the magnitude of the problems we face as a global community. I am rendered a useless sobbing wreck, devoid of joy. But not devoid of hope. Instead I focus on the small stuff. The daily good deeds that make a difference. The Good News!

There is a viral quote that often circulates in the wake of tragic public events.

“When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping. To this day, especially in times of disaster, I remember my mother’s words, and I am always comforted by realizing that there are still so many helpers — so many caring people in this world.”

So how does a Seabird do good deeds in dark times? How can we be the people that are helping?

The answer was assumed and simple. We set up a business that gives back!

We have a trading arm webshop that gives supporters the opportunity to give as they live. Giving makes you feel good. So does shopping. So why not combine the two?. The internet is accessible to all and our products are affordable, ethically sourced and sustainable. It’s conscious consumerism. Community Interest Companies are governed the same rigour as any other Company ensuring integrity and honesty in its trading but the profits don’t go to shareholders. They go back into the community.

We have a service that enables people to access the sea in a safe environment with the aim of improving their well being. In an age when modern day living rituals have a profoundly negative impact on mental health, the supporting services are being cut back. People are unable to access state funded services unless they meet certain thresholds. We have received National Lottery Funding to run our first wellbeing service courses aimed at women who lack the confidence to swim outdoors that is accessible to all. Until our trading business is buoyant enough to financially support this service we will continue to raise funds via grants.  This Service provides a contribution to the community.

We have a community of year round sea swimmers and Seabird supporters. These seabirds, sea dogs and sea squids give up their time to read through our business plans, set up Pop Ups, review our accounts, volunteer in the water and provide us with feedback. But most importantly they join us in the sea on a regular basis, so we too get respite from from running a new small business. Being part of a local community group  being part of something bigger, being part of the change keeps our business and our mood buoyant.

 

Doing good really does feel good and whilst it won’t solve the world’s problems, as Vincent Van Gogh said ‘Great things are done by a series of small things brought together’. Together we can do good deeds in dark times.

Author: Seabird Kath

Whilst you are here………Our next fundraiser is the  Aviva Community Fund. We are not asking for money but we are asking for 3 minutes of your time to register and vote via the link above. You get 10 votes and can use different email aliases to vote more than once. 

We hope to receive funds to buy equipment like swim hats and dry robes – to keep participants warm and safe, changing and pool facility hire – to provide a safe environment for participants to get used to open water swimming, administration costs and dedicated coaches and instructors to facilitate the courses to ensure the participants get the best out of the courses. Female-centric courses with participants falling into a similar age bracket in a safe and structured environment may be the only way some women would even consider swimming the sea. We are passionate about encouraging more women into the waves to improve their wellbeing and voting for this project would make this happen

Thank you!!!

Tips for warming up after sea swimming

“After drop” is common after swimming in cold water; you get out and feel fine, and then you start to get colder, sometimes growing faint, shivering violently and feeling unwell.” (Outdoor Swimming Society) 

Learning to head off the after drop is a key part of continuing to swim in cold water all year round. While in the cold water you can be lured into a false sense of security (numbness!) and stay in for what turns out to be too long. With practice you learn your limitations and just how cold you are going to be about 10 minutes after getting out. You then moderate your swim times and get out before you feel you have to. Then the key is warming up – slowly. If you have a hot shower, for example, the blood can run from your core (where it is working hard to maintain your core temperature and keep you alive!) to your skin and actually make your temperature drop along with your blood pressure – potentially making you feel faint and ‘stinging’ your skin.

Tips to warm up after you get out of cold water: 

  • Get dressed as soon as you can. Preferably starting with the top half of your body.  Use a haramaki. As you start to warm up blood starts to recirculate in your extremities and peripheral blood vessels, cooling as it travels. You can lose up to 4.5°C from your core temperature so a haramaki is great.
  • Use a robe or a sports cloak to get dressed quicker and protect you from the windchill as well as your dignity.
  • Put on a hat and gloves and have some tea from a flask you brought with you!
  • Put on lots of layers. Haramaki, gloves, hat, thermals.
  • Sip a warm drink: this helps warm the body gently from the inside.
  • Eat something: sugar will help raise body temperature so have some cake!
  • Sit in a warm environment: chance for more tea and more cake with your fellow swimmers….
  • Walk around to generate body heat. It can take some time to warm properly. Running up and down the beach while waiting for your friends-who-faff can help.

For more information about acclimatising to cold water, the benefits and the risks go to the Outdoor Swimming Society 

If you have any good tips please add in the comments 🙂

Author: Cath Seabird