Do Good Deeds in Dark Times

Doing good makes you feel good! How the Seabirds built doing good into their business

The Seabirds became a flotilla as our moral compass points the same way so swimming with each other in the same direction was easy. When we decided to start a business together our decision to be a social enterprise wasn’t even discussed. It was assumed. Registering as Community Interest Company was as fundamentally a part of our company set up as registering with Companies House and signing our Articles of Association. Ultimately we are a business and we need to make money to thrive. But with the money we make we reinvest in our business and donate to causes that share our aims of improving wellbeing and the environment. So why do we do this?

The News is full of unhappy headlines. The impact of austerity on the most vulnerable in society. Leaving Europe with ‘No Deal’. Climate Change and the plight of the Polar Bear. Global Civil War and unrest adding to the Refugee Crisis. I could go on but you get the picture.

I don’t read or watch the News. I bury my head firmly in the sand. It’s a form of Self Care. If I let myself dwell on the day’s news I become overwhelmed at the magnitude of the problems we face as a global community. I am rendered a useless sobbing wreck, devoid of joy. But not devoid of hope. Instead I focus on the small stuff. The daily good deeds that make a difference. The Good News!

There is a viral quote that often circulates in the wake of tragic public events.

“When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping. To this day, especially in times of disaster, I remember my mother’s words, and I am always comforted by realizing that there are still so many helpers — so many caring people in this world.”

So how does a Seabird do good deeds in dark times? How can we be the people that are helping?

The answer was assumed and simple. We set up a business that gives back!

We have a trading arm webshop that gives supporters the opportunity to give as they live. Giving makes you feel good. So does shopping. So why not combine the two?. The internet is accessible to all and our products are affordable, ethically sourced and sustainable. It’s conscious consumerism. Community Interest Companies are governed the same rigour as any other Company ensuring integrity and honesty in its trading but the profits don’t go to shareholders. They go back into the community.

We have a service that enables people to access the sea in a safe environment with the aim of improving their well being. In an age when modern day living rituals have a profoundly negative impact on mental health, the supporting services are being cut back. People are unable to access state funded services unless they meet certain thresholds. We have received National Lottery Funding to run our first wellbeing service courses aimed at women who lack the confidence to swim outdoors that is accessible to all. Until our trading business is buoyant enough to financially support this service we will continue to raise funds via grants.  This Service provides a contribution to the community.

We have a community of year round sea swimmers and Seabird supporters. These seabirds, sea dogs and sea squids give up their time to read through our business plans, set up Pop Ups, review our accounts, volunteer in the water and provide us with feedback. But most importantly they join us in the sea on a regular basis, so we too get respite from from running a new small business. Being part of a local community group  being part of something bigger, being part of the change keeps our business and our mood buoyant.

 

Doing good really does feel good and whilst it won’t solve the world’s problems, as Vincent Van Gogh said ‘Great things are done by a series of small things brought together’. Together we can do good deeds in dark times.

Author: Seabird Kath

Whilst you are here………Our next fundraiser is the  Aviva Community Fund. We are not asking for money but we are asking for 3 minutes of your time to register and vote via the link above. You get 10 votes and can use different email aliases to vote more than once. 

We hope to receive funds to buy equipment like swim hats and dry robes – to keep participants warm and safe, changing and pool facility hire – to provide a safe environment for participants to get used to open water swimming, administration costs and dedicated coaches and instructors to facilitate the courses to ensure the participants get the best out of the courses. Female-centric courses with participants falling into a similar age bracket in a safe and structured environment may be the only way some women would even consider swimming the sea. We are passionate about encouraging more women into the waves to improve their wellbeing and voting for this project would make this happen

Thank you!!!

Libby in the Lakes – swimming with my daughter

I am a Seabird. I swim in the sea. I am not anti Lidos, Lakes and Lochs I just prefer the sea and it helps that it is on my doorstep. This summer I swapped the salt for freshwater swimming in the Lake District and Scotland with a sneaky anniversary trip to the rivers of the Somerset levels. They didn’t disappoint. All special for different reasons. The Lakes because I swam with my daughter.

My eldest child did her GCSEs this summer and I was keen for her to have the best summer ever as a reward for working so hard. She, like me swims in the sea all year round albeit in a wet-suit and as part of her Surf Life Saving weekly training sessions. She is an incredible swimmer, powerful and fast. If I got into trouble in the sea I would want her there. But other than her weekly session and the occasional dip with mates after school she doesn’t swim in the sea, at least not with me. I don’t know why not, I make her look like an elegant mermaid as I splash around frantically trying to keep up with her. Maybe it’s just not cool to hang out with your mum when you are 16! So it was a massive surprise when she agreed to come swimming in the Lake District with me.

The plan was for she and I to drive up to the Lakes on our way to Scotland for a family holiday. My husband and son would fly up to Glasgow to meet us when my youngest had broken up from school. Best laid plans. She soon backed out of the Scotland trip as she wanted to hang out with her mates. Fortunately she still wanted to do the Lakes with me. So as my husband and son arrived in Alba, she got on the same plane and flew home. All she saw of Scotland was Gretna Green Service Station and Glasgow Airport! But not before we had a fantastic couple of days exploring tarns, rivers and waterfalls.

The course has been set for uncharted territory. Not just the unfamiliar freshwater lakes but we are entering a new phase as Libby leaves school. She is changing fast and I am trying to keep up. It’s hard enough trying to keep up with her swimming!  I can cope with the late nights and the boozy experiments and think I have finally grasped what ‘linking’ is but I miss her. She just doesn’t want to be with me anymore. She either wants to be out with her mates or alone in her room. I have created an independent young woman with very strong ideas about who she wants to be and who she wants to be with. And it ain’t me! It’s everything I wished for but I feel bereft.

I was determined we would have the best time together so she could see what she was missing hanging out with her dear ol’ Ma. Spending time with your teens is hard. There is such pressure for the snatched moments you have together to be better than snapchat scrolling you inevitably end up arguing. Probably over snapchat scrolling. But I was not deterred.  Armed with my Wild Guide, we still managed to get lost, but when we didn’t we swam and chatted, swam and laughed, swam and squealed.

It was a wonderful couple of days with a beautiful back drop. I will definitely return to the Lake District. Hopefully with Libby. It was over all too soon and normal service soon resumed. Back to feeling like I had an empty nest but the fledgling was still in it. Redundant in my role as a parent as my child was now self sufficient and flying free.  There is a wealth of information about parenting from how to potty train and other developmental milestones but nothing had prepared me for this. Grieving for a girl that was just upstairs

I am still trying to catch up with the speed at which she is growing (and swimming). I still ask he if she wants to come on a dog walk with me even when I know the answer will be no. Ever hopeful that one day the answer will be yes. Our interactions are mainly me hovering at her bedroom door asking her if she wants of cup of tea. There are still the rare moments when she comes into the kitchen and wants a chat but she in is charge of when this will be.

It was during one of these moments when she told me she really enjoyed swimming in the Lake District with me. She ‘just liked being with me on her own’ and ‘found it relaxing’. In teenage talk that was a very long conversation! It took every ounce of self control not to book a lifetimes worth of trips right there and right then to ensure we would always have that time together. Instead I very coolly suggested she might like to do The Big Bala Swim with me next year. (In my head I was cool, I may well have squeaked it whilst clinging to her). And she has agreed! So next year Gwynedd with my Girl. Until then bedroom hovering will have to do.

Author: Seabirds Kath

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Tips for warming up after sea swimming

“After drop” is common after swimming in cold water; you get out and feel fine, and then you start to get colder, sometimes growing faint, shivering violently and feeling unwell.” (Outdoor Swimming Society) 

Learning to head off the after drop is a key part of continuing to swim in cold water all year round. While in the cold water you can be lured into a false sense of security (numbness!) and stay in for what turns out to be too long. With practice you learn your limitations and just how cold you are going to be about 10 minutes after getting out. You then moderate your swim times and get out before you feel you have to. Then the key is warming up – slowly. If you have a hot shower, for example, the blood can run from your core (where it is working hard to maintain your core temperature and keep you alive!) to your skin and actually make your temperature drop along with your blood pressure – potentially making you feel faint and ‘stinging’ your skin.

Tips to warm up after you get out of cold water: 

  • Get dressed as soon as you can. Preferably starting with the top half of your body.  Use a haramaki. As you start to warm up blood starts to recirculate in your extremities and peripheral blood vessels, cooling as it travels. You can lose up to 4.5°C from your core temperature so a haramaki is great.
  • Use a robe or a sports cloak to get dressed quicker and protect you from the windchill as well as your dignity.
  • Put on a hat and gloves and have some tea from a flask you brought with you!
  • Put on lots of layers. Haramaki, gloves, hat, thermals.
  • Sip a warm drink: this helps warm the body gently from the inside.
  • Eat something: sugar will help raise body temperature so have some cake!
  • Sit in a warm environment: chance for more tea and more cake with your fellow swimmers….
  • Walk around to generate body heat. It can take some time to warm properly. Running up and down the beach while waiting for your friends-who-faff can help.

For more information about acclimatising to cold water, the benefits and the risks go to the Outdoor Swimming Society 

If you have any good tips please add in the comments 🙂

Author: Cath Seabird

I Found My Tribe – Seabirds October Book Club Read

I don’t believe we are just numbing ourselves in this sea. I look at my friends coping and surviving. Like the rolling of waves, the thrill of the dive, the rush of the cold, they choose to stay unchained. This is as free as we can possibly be

So this months book review has been written in one of Brighton’s Cafes when I was able to prise my hands away from a hot steaming mug.  I have just been for a sea swim and now it is October there is definitely a drop in the air temperature requiring a thaw out afterwards. What better way to do it on International Coffee Day, in a Cafe, writing about a book that resonated with me so strongly. This month’s book is ‘I Found My Tribe’ by Ruth Fitzmaurice.

I have very little in common with the author but so much in common with her. It is a collection of memories of her life, with her membership in the Tragic Wives’ Swimming Club as a back drop. It documents her thoughts, fears, experiences and swims from the point when her husband is diagnosed with MND to a full moon swim on their wedding anniversary. The chapters are all short and sweet with the most wonderful titles, such as ‘Waves (And Cheese Puffs)’

The things I do not have in common with the author are numerous. She has 5 kids none of whom are in double digits and I have 2 teenagers but we are both mums. Her husband has Motor Neurone Disease and can only communicate with his eyes. Mine is fighting fit but we both struggle to always see eye to eye with our spouses. She lives in rural Ireland and I live in urban Brighton but we both love swimming in the sea and use it as a coping strategy to deal with everyday life. She swims with the Tragic Wives’ Club and I swim with the Salty Seabirds.

I genuinely do not know how she has managed to fit in a swim with 5 children and a husband who needs round the clock care. She is really quite remarkable, hugely resilient and a great role model for modern day mothers. But the best bit about the book is you can easily pick it up and put it down. It is a perfect read for the train or bus as they are all short sweet chapters that can be read independently of each other. Or for those of us that start to get sleepy when we read before bed. Or for readers that just want to grab a read with a sandwich at lunchtime. Just remember your tissues!

Along with Lynne Roper who penned last month’s book Wild Woman Swimming, I was inspired by Ruth to organise a Harvest Moon swim for the Seabirds last week. Ruth’s moon swim is the conclusion to her book and it was something I was very keen to try. It was wonderful watching my tribe appear across the shingle and make their way to the waters edge to swim under a simply stunning full moon. At that moment I knew I had found my tribe.

Hope you all enjoy the book – as ever please do let us know!