Do it for David – alternatives to plastic

Being plastic free is hard. There are lots of images on Social Media and slightly preachy people telling you to change your ways as they eat from bamboo bowls. But old habits die hard. And giving up plastic is bloomin’ hard. They don’t tell you that. That conversation is not in the public domain about just how hard it is to avoid plastic all together. It’s easy to post and despair at a single tangerine peeled and packaged in a plastic tub. It’s also easy to avoid buying ridiculous products like this. But in reality, in day to day life, when you have a habit that has been part of your upbringing and culture for your whole life, it’s bloomin’ hard.  To even realise you’ve consumed single use plastic sometimes is hard as it’s our way of life to grab a bottle of water when thirsty or a ready-made sandwich when hungry. We all know we need to reduce our plastic consumption and stop polluting the seas or we will inevitably kill off life on earth. But we have a habit of convenience and a cupboard full of Tupperware.

However, as the famous supermarket that packages skinned fruit in plastic says, ‘every little helps’. And at Seabirds HQ, much like the rest of the nation, we have fallen for David, (not Hasslehoff). Along with 14 million other viewers we tuned in every Sunday night to Blue Planet II to listen to David Attenborough tell us, gently and stoically we are killing ocean life. We want him to be our uncle/dad/granddad and have him round for Sunday roasts. But who can forget the dead whale calf that the mother refused to let go. Hope in a hopeless situation.

David has bought the conversation to the table, the pub, on-line, Westminster. So let’s #doitfordavid and think about the small, easy, manageable changes we can make. There is no planet B so we need a plan A. Here is our Plan A Top 10 affordable and achievable changes.

  1. Straws – Do you really need a straw to drink your drink? Unless you are a small child or physically challenged I would suggest the answer is no. So when you are out and about either refuse a plastic straw if offered or bring your own stainless steel one. I like to slurp up my morning smoothie through a straw so have stainless steel ones in my cutlery drawer.
  2. Toothbrush – every time I watch Bear Grylls take some more nauseatingly annoying people onto a deserted island to survive I despair. Not just at the contestants, but at the tide of plastic on these beautiful paradise beaches and it is always toothbrushes! So switch to bamboo. Simples!
  3. Coffee Cup – this is a money saving change too. Most coffee shops will discount their coffee price if you are using a reusable cup. There are lots on the market to choose from but be warned some are made from plastic! So chose a bamboo, stainless steel or glass. (The paper disposable cups on offer do not recycle as they are chemically coated to make them waterproof.)
  4. Water Bottle – loads of people carry their own water bottle when they go to the gym, in the car or just out and about, So switch to non-plastic bottles. You can get aesthetically beautiful isothermal bottles now which keep water cold for 24 hours.
  5. Reducing microfibres – this is the invisible mainly unknown threat to our seas. Most of our clothes, especially from affordable high street stores, contain microfibres. Naked to the human eye, tiny pieces of plastic that make up the material, are released when washed into rivers and the sea. Avoiding the obvious ones like microfibre towel and replacing them with cotton ones is easy. Avoiding high street fashion is not so easy. Some shops like H&M have a conscious range of clothes made from natural organic materials like cotton that do not contain microfibres. For synthetic materials, an easy solution is a bag to use in your washing machine that traps the microfibres like a Guppy Friend.
  6. Shampoo – not all shampoo comes in plastic bottles. Many cosmetic companies are now creating shampoo bars. Seabirds are big fans of Lush shampoo bars which fit into a handy tin to store. A tiny bit froths up beautifully so it lasts for ages. We are still on the hunt for a conditioner bar that can handle our sea ravaged and (sun) bleached hair.
  7. Soap – we didn’t always dispense our soap from a pump action plastic bottle. In the days of yore we had bars of soap. So just go back to them!
  8. Bag for Life – I think most people now have these in their boot when they go to the supermarket. But how many people remember to take them to their local shops or are caught short during an impulse purchase. A string bag or fold away bag for life which folds into it’s own storage pocket is the answer. Mine is from a well known supermarket chain.
  9. Pick Up Litter – there are lots of local beach cleans organised by local community groups, Surfers against Sewage, Marine Conservation Society and the like. Here in Brighton we have the wonder Pier2Pier Silent Disco Beach Cleans. But you don’t need to wait for someone to organise one….don’t worry I am not suggesting you organise one yourself. But when you go to the park, the beach, or anywhere really, if you see litter pick it up. Yes the bins are always full and never emptied so take it home!
  10. Festival Pints – the summer staple for many is a festival and they are a great way to spend a hedonistic weekend. But oh the aftermath of litter. Obviously glass and cans are a danger to humans but the alternative plastic and wax coated paper cups used are a danger to the environment. So pack a stainless steel pint pot. It keeps your drink cold, for beer drinkers it retains the head and it is just so much nicer to drink out of. If you don;t believe us just ask Beer Yeti. Again we chill in the fridge and use for smoothies at home.

There are lots of other changes you can make. I have recently started to carry bamboo cutlery in my handbag and my swimsuit is made from econyl.  Many say why bother when our refuse collection companies don’t actually recycle the stuff we put in recycling bins……but David has given us hope. So these are our top 10 easy and affordable changes. No preaching, just suggesting. It is hard but #doitfordavid

Image result for david attenborough blue planet

 

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Turkish Towel

Turkish Towel – a Product Review.

Where better to write a Hammam towel review than in Turkey. This seabird is currently on tour on a balcony over looking the Mediterranean Sea. I have packed light to avoid extortionate luggage charges and bought my beautiful Hammam towel with me which is practically weightless. In countries as hot as this, there really is no need for a conventional towel, you almost dry off on the walk back to your sunbathing spot.

Hammam towels originated in the bath houses of Rome and the Middle East. The weekly tradition of bathing for most has increased to a daily shower but the Hammam is no less popular.

Although originally designed as a quick drying towel for hot and humid bath houses it now used for so many other things.

1. Scarf

2. Throw

3. Picnic blanket

4. Table cloth

5. Sarong

6. Gym towel

7. Yoga mat cover

The cotton fibre used to flat weave Hammam towel is so thin, detailed, beautiful patterns and designs can be achieved. Being stylish on the beach isn’t the only reason that Seabirds sell these woven wonderful towels. It’s in reponse to demand for a lightweight quick drying towel for swimmers that doesn’t contain microfibres.

Lots of discount sport outlet shops sell microfibre towels to keen amateur sports enthusiasts. We can see their appeal. However, the hammam ticks all of the same boxes without any impact on the environment.

Many people do not realise that when synthetic towels and clothes are washed, they release teeny tiny plastic bits called microfibres. These small pieces of plastic, flow down our drains, undetected through water treatment plants, and out into our rivers, lakes and oceans by the billions. They then enter the food chain as they are easily ingested by fish and other animals. Natural fibres like cotton don’t contain synthetic fibres and therefore, are a solution to plastic pollution. So switch to a Hammam.

Seabirds Pop Up where you least expect it

Summer fairs, fetes and festivals. Anywhere there is bunting and a chance to chat the Seabirds will ‘Pop Up’.

‘Popping Up’ is a really good way of gaining retail space, a shop front if you like, without committing to expensive lease agreements, employee wages and business rates. It allows you to get to know your customers and solicit face to face feedback in an informal setting at a really low cost. As well as being an opportunity to sell our reusable and sustainable goods it is also allows you to connect and start a conversation about sea swimming and the benefits associated with it.

In addition to the launch of our website and on-line shop , the summer of 2018 has seen us ‘Pop Up’ at The Friends of Blakers Park fete and Balfour School Summer Fair. Both incredibly friendly and well organised events providing a gateway into the community. This months sees us attending The Brunswick Festival on August 18th & 19th and Lagoonfest on September 8th. Both a bit closer to the sea so there will be opportunities for a quick dip in our break.

So pop along and you may spot a seabird or two………

If you like what we do and want to support our start up Community Interest Company but aren’t able to make the events some supportive local businesses have started to stock Seabird products. We have been warmly welcomed into the Brighton Beach Community by Brighton Watersports and Brighton Bikes who are displaying some of our own branded goods. If you head down there to hire bikes or boards you will see the seabird logo in their shop fronts.

Also Quaff and Wastenot shop have pledged their support by stocking seabird coffee cups, water bottles and pint pots. Local businesses helping each other and sharing the Seabird love has kept us buoyant as we navigate the sometimes rough seas of starting up your own business. It’s true when they say , when you buy from a small business and actual person does a little happy dance.

So come find us at our Pop Ups or buy local and make someone dance. Be part of the community.

A Tale of Two Swims

My first swim of the day was in the morning at Lifeguard Post Romeo 8 on Brighton Beach. This is just in front of the beautifully restored bandstand. It’s the spot the Seabirds swim from when we do early morning swims as it’s sort of midway between us all and you can avoid the extortionate parking fees at that time in the morning. There were due to be 3 of us on this particular day. It was a 10.30am meet, the tide was going out and it was like a mill pond, as it has been for much of the summer. Perfect conditions for going round the buoys.

The swim area buoys are the signal that it is summer in Brighton. They appear in-front of the 11 Lifeguard posts from Saltdean to Hove Lagoon in May and stay there until September. Unless there is a particularly strong storm where they can end up all over the place. They are placed 100m apart, going out and across 200m. With the growth in outdoor swimming and triathlon popularity they are used by locals to roughly measure the distance of their swims. A couple of the swim areas can resemble the M25 when clubs and groups meet there to clock up some kilometres.

On this particular day we had the swim area almost to ourselves as myself and Seabird Ruth headed out to the first buoy. Between the first and second buoy I was into the usual hypnotic rhythm when I began to hear something from under the water. It was different from the usual close to shore shingle song or the sound of the wake you create. It was a low level hum that just got louder and louder to the point of distraction. At that point I stopped swimming and looked up. I was a couple of metres from the furthest buoy and immediately saw the source of the noise. A speedboat going at a ridiculous speed practically in the swim area, no more than 5 metres from my swim capped head. As you can imagine the driver received the type of verbal assault that would make a salty sea dog blush. He proceeded further into Hove and dropped his anchor right in the middle of the quiet family beaches.

By this time seabird Ruth had caught up and was also using swear words we save for serious safety situations. And then another female swimmer. We proceeded to stop at the buoy to discuss, the proximity of losing my head, machismo, jet skis, idiots but most importantly swim safety. The swim community never ceases to amaze me. 3 women who have just met, sharing stories 200 metres out to sea. We concluded that even though we were within the swim area it would be sensible to wear a swim tow floatas well as our brightly coloured hats. Particularly as some seabird swims are parallel to the beach and leave the swim area although remain in close proximity to the shore.

It spooked me enough to head back in. I’d lost my swim mojo. We joined our third Seabird in the shallows for a frolic instead. We were met on the shoreline by a lovely lifeguard who advised us that she was keeping a careful eye on us and was also outraged at the idiot (insert other word here) driving the boat. She had reported it to the Seafront office and it was registered at the Marina. Unfortunately the Seafront boat hadn’t launched yet to intercept but they would be having a conversation later with the offender to hammer home that inappropriate speed, metres from the swim area was not only stupid and unnecessary but dangerous.

The good news was it was a double dip day and I was due to meet Ian, one of the beach lifeguards for a swim at Romeo 10 in front of the King Alfred swimming pool during his lunch break. Boy was it busy with swimmers. As we entered the water Ian proceeded to tell me that one of the Seafront Coordinators had seen a shark the day before. I laughed it off as a dog fish. We bumped into one of the Swim Trek directors finishing his lunchtime swim in the shallows as we were warming up. It was slack tide so we could swim either way around the buoys and chose to go west to east. At the first buoy Ian decided I needed to do swim drills. So we headed to the furthest buoy with me tapping my head with my hand, next buoy finger drags, next buoy arm pit tapping and so on until we’d completed a circuit.

From a fright to frollicking to swim drills all in one day.

I made the school girl error of enquiring more about the shark spotting. Turns out it was more than a bottom feeding dogfish. 5-6ft and definitely not a cetacean………

Surf Solace – an introduction to the South Coast’s newest charity

Over recent years a lot has been written about young people’s mental health. The teenage years are a challenging time for all young people as they struggle with changing bodies, hormones and establishing their place in the adult world. For some, due to family relationships, socio-economic factors, mental illness such as anxiety or depression, unique traits such as autism, or specific traumas such as bereavement, it can all become just too much. Moreover, in these times of austerity, the services that provide young people with the support they need to navigate these challenges are sadly, barely available.

Local Fire Fighter, Shaun Challis, has become all too aware of this during his time coaching young people in various aquatic sports and school enrichment programmes. Hence his drive to set up a new charity ‘Surf Solace’ on the shores of Lancing Beach in West Sussex. 1 in 10 young people aged from 5 to 15 suffer from a mental health problem (Mental Health Foundation, 2013). Factors that can influence this are apparent in this community and the Local Authority report ‘Adur and Worthing Community Profile 2014’ shows Adur to be the most deprived local authority area in West Sussex; with anti-social behaviour as the most common crime. Adur also has the highest percentage of 16+ year olds with no qualifications in West Sussex, over a quarter of the entire 16+ population – a shocking statistic by any measure.

‘Taking the waters’ for health and well being has a long history in the UK. There’s growing evidence to support the tradition of sea swimming, surfing, etc for health and well being; suggesting time spent in natural settings, like beaches is beneficial.  

Surf Solace aims to improve young people’s self-esteem and well being by using the sea as a resource!  They will provide six-week, sea-based activity courses for up to 20 children and young people aged 11-18, who are at risk of social exclusion or mental health issues. Sessions will be delivered with 1:1 support from volunteers within the local beach community; bringing both participants and experienced sea and beach users together. The idea being that the participants grow in self-confidence and learn new skills to help them navigate through life. Most importantly, the sessions are free of any pressure to succeed – participants can work at their own pace and achieve their own goals. To take part, clients must be referred by someone working with them professionally, such as a support worker, teacher, doctor, counsellor or similar. Best of all, there will be no charge for the courses.

The new charity has 3 Trustees; all local people, who advocate the positive impact the sea environment can have on well-being and recognise the need for ‘Sea Therapy’ in the community. Phil is a local sports enthusiast who runs his own water activity company and has regularly volunteered as a mentor to young people.  Mel manages the BHT Threshold Women’s Service & their Mental Health and Wellbeing Service. In her younger days she was an outdoor pursuits instructor and a competitive swimmer. She is an experienced  psychotherapist who regularly volunteers for local community groups that focus on the sea and well-being. Lastly Ferg is a dad that has learnt to surf in his middle age and gradually love the sea! (mainly as he is forced to spend most of his spare time in the sea with his wife and kids). Crucially, he is familiar with the third sector and gives up much of his time to support small, local charities.

However, setting up a new charity is no easy task; particularly in the light of the bad press many larger, well known charities are attracting. The first hurdle has been a chicken and egg conundrum. In order to gain approval from the Charity Commission you need to demonstrate cash in your bank account. In order to get start-up funds via grant applications you must be a registered charity. So, unless you have a wealthy benefactor, you’re rather up against it. Seabirds Brighton CIC have pledged our support for the fledgling charity in the form of unrestricted funds via the profits from our trading arm web shop and crowdfunding campaign. Sadly, this has not yet been sufficient to launch the pilot therapy course planned for September 2018 due to substantial set-up costs. Amongst other things, expensive public liability insurance is mandatory sea activity equipment such as wetsuits and surf boards don’t come cheap. Although this has been disappointing for all involved, the upside is that it has provided more time to concentrate on fundraising activities to ensure that everything is ready to go in Spring/Early Summer 2019.

What you can do to help

  • Donate – either your time, old equipment like foam surfboards, wetsuits etc or cold hard cash. You can also contact them to understand how you can make a one-off donation or set up a monthly standing order to support their aim of getting more kids in the water and improving their outlook on life.
  • You can contact Surf Solace  by following them on Facebook to offer your services as a volunteer, both in and out of the water, or drop off old equipment.
  • Buy products from Seabirds to provide unrestricted funding for the 2019 courses.
  • Attend events – throughout the year there will be events to raise funds for Surf Solace – the most imminent being Perch Beach outdoor cinema nights on Lancing beach.

 

August Book Club Read

August already, so time for another book. I hope you enjoyed the previous two reads, The Salt Path and The Last Wave.

This Seabird is about to jet off to Turkey for two weeks and this is the book I am taking with me! The Whitstable High Tide Swimming Club by Katie May. The author is a sea swimmer who lives in Whitstable a shingle beach similar to that of Brighton. So she is a Seabird by default.

The Good Read Review said –  the uplifting novel about friendship, community spirit and how ordinary people protect what they love. 

It struck a real chord with me as it is about friendships formed on the beach and in the sea. There is a familiar backdrop of a change in personal circumstances for some of the characters. This is exactly how the Seabirds came together. During difficult times we found each other and the solace of sea swimming, drawing strength from each other.  We never planned to keep going all year round, we just didn’t stop and grew into a a wonderfully eclectic sea swimming group. We became the Seabird Community.

One of the book’s characters is described as a bossy organiser – I think I know that seabird is me!

As ever with the Seabirds Virtual Book Club please let us know your recommendations and you thoughts on previous reads. I can’t wait to get on a sun lounger and start this months.